A Sunday Suppers Favourite – Browned Butter Blondies

A pan of blondies can be stirred together in 5 minutes and slid into a warm oven as everyone sits down to eat; when it’s time for dessert, it’s ready. If you like, bake them in a 9-inch (23 cm) round cake pan and serve in slightly fancier wedges, with a scoop of ice cream.

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Asparagus and Brussels Sprouts Carbonara

Pasta carbonara (also known in less fancy circles as “bacon ‘n’ eggs pasta”) is delicious, but in the springtime, it’s nice to lighten up the classics with some green veg. This version of carbonara brings in Brussels sprouts and asparagus for some spring flavour. If you have a food processor, use it to get your sprouts nice and thin — if you don’t have one handy, just trim off the ends and loose outer leaves (and wash them!) and slice them as thinly as possible with a sharp knife. Read More

Our New Year’s Resolution

Hi Friends,

Last year was certainly an exciting one with the release of our new book, Best of Bridge Sunday Suppers, and a cross-country tour in which we were able to connect with so many of you.

We enjoyed a much-needed break to spend time with friends and family over the holiday season and we spent the first few weeks of January reflecting on resolutions for the new year ahead.

If we had to prioritize one resolution for 2018, it would be what we’re calling the “Sunday Suppers Resolution.” In 2018, we resolve to reserve a few Sundays each month to reconnect with those that mean the most to us over – you guessed it! – a truly fantastic meal.

We’re hoping that you will join us in making this one of your goals for the new year, and we have just the perfect cookbook to help you accomplish this!

Wishing you all a happy and healthy 2018!

 

Classic Gingerbread

Everyone needs a good gingerbread recipe in their repertoire; this is a classic, and can be used for gingerbread men or any other shape. If you want to hang them, poke a hole with a straw near the top of each cookie before baking, and slide a string or ribbon through after they cool. Decorate with royal frosting, which will harden and not be sticky. To make chocolate gingerbread, swap about 1/3 cup of the flour for cocoa.

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Slow Cooker Nuts and Bolts

Nuts and bolts are a holiday cocktail party staple, we can’t imagine the season without them. It’s fun to experiment with different flavours — sweet, spicy, curried — but we also like sticking to this classic, dressed with Worcestershire and plenty of butter. Since our ovens are usually full of cookies, flaky appetizers and other goodies over the holidays, we like turning to the slow cooker to take care of the nuts and bolts. You have to be around to stir the mixture so it doesn’t catch on the bottom of the crock, but they do cook up fairly quickly (compared to other slow cooker recipes at least).

This recipe appears in our book The Family Slow Cooker (which also includes a sweet snack mix) and can be easily adapted to use up whatever cereal or crispy snacks you may have on hand. We often leave out the peanuts out for friends who may have allergies and to keep the mix school safe. Read More

Peanut Butter Hot Chocolate

Hot chocolate is a staple around here, but we sometimes get tired of the usual cocoa mix (cocoa + icing sugar) swirled into warmed milk. Since we’re all fans of peanut butter and chocolate, years ago I tried swirling a spoonful of creamy peanut butter into hot chocolate, and it was a hit. Rich and delicious, it’s enough of an energy boost to take with you in a Thermos to the ski hill, skating, or when you come inside after some snow shovelling or snowman-building.

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Olive Cheese Balls

There are some recipes that are so essential to individual families’ holidays that the thought of doing Christmas without them is just unfathomable. In Elizabeth’s family, that recipe is for Olive Cheese Balls — little puffs of cheesy shortbread wrapped around green pimento-stuffed olives. Elizabeth’s mom always made them for her annual Boxing Day party and now Elizabeth makes them for her own early December open house to kick off the season.

These were a staple in the ’70s (when Elizabeth’s mom would have first discovered them) — there is indeed a version called Olive Cheese Balls in the very first Best of Bridge cookbook. The original ladies called them Olive Cheese Puffs and suggested using gherkins or cocktail onions in place of the olives and spicing things up with a half teaspoon of paprika (a little bit of cayenne would also work). Whichever way you go, these freeze beautifully — freeze them after they’ve been fully baked and then reheat them until the dough softens up and the olives inside are warm. Read More

Barley Banana Bread

 

Banana bread is a staple at all of our houses, but we always like to sneak in a nutritional boost wherever we can. This loaf is made with overripe bananas (the ones that tumble from the freezer whenever you open the door) and barley flour – along with regular all-purpose flour, it adds a delicious nuttiness and boosts fibre even more than whole wheat flour would. You can find it alongside the other flours in the baking section of most grocery stores, and once you try it you’ll find yourself using it in pancakes, cookies, muffins, cakes – and as a bonus, it’s Canada’s third largest crop (after wheat and canola), and more than half the barley grown in Canada is right here in Alberta.

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Slow Cooker Dill Pickle Soup

This time of year we crave a good belly warming soup — and homemade soup is even better if you let it simmer away in the slow cooker while you’re out skiing or playing in the snow. The feeling of coming how to a warm crock of soup is one of the best parts of winter.

This recipe for Dill Pickle Soup is from our 2016 book The Family Slow Cooker. While the flavour may seem odd (yes, you do put the pickle brine right in the soup!), it’s actually surprisingly hearty and delicious. Give it a try — you can adjust the amount of brine you use to your own tastes, but we think the more brine the better! Read More

Samarna’s Mutthiya Kebabs

My sister works with plenty of great cooks, but Samarna stands out as a truly exceptional home cook – she invited me to her kitchen earlier this year to cook, and made the most amazing ground meat kebabs – like large meatballs she shaped in the palm of her hands. They were simple, but delicious – you could make them with ground beef or lamb, and mix together a quick tzatziki to dip them in or dribble overtop. The perfect kind of food when you have a few extra people at the table.

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Slow Cooker Jelly Meatballs

Like a lot of readers, we love so many of the original ladies’ entertaining recipes. For example, no matter how cooking trends change, if there’s a dish of Jelly Meatballs on a buffet table, we’re going to grab a toothpick and eat at least a couple of them. Simple and convenient to make, the jelly ball may just be the perfect holiday appetizer.

When we put together our Family Slow Cooker book last year, we wanted to include some of these original recipes, cooked up in a slow cooker for even more convenience. The original Jelly Balls recipe, which appeared in the Winners Book (and can still be found in the Complete Best of Bridge Cookbooks Volume 2) were cooked in a pot and then served in a chafing dish, but this version is done completely in a slow cooker. We also use frozen fully cooked meatballs to make things even easier. If you want to add some heat, throw in a couple of tablespoons of sambal oelek with the jelly. Read More

Creamy Chicken, Corn & Vegetable Chowder

With so many veggies at their peak in the fall, it’s a great time to make a hearty bowl of chowder. This recipe makes great use of leftover roasted turkey and stock, too – often we’ll just use a meaty stock that has not been strained, rather than measure out leftover roast chicken or turkey. This soup is equally delicious with leftover chopped ham in place of the chicken.

As with most soups, ingredients can be played with and measurements are approximate – use what you like, add more carrots if you like carrots, add a handful of baby spinach (we did, when we reheated the leftovers) or chopped kale or chard. Soup is infinitely versatile, inexpensive, and can be frozen for a quick meal down the road.

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Herbed Bulgur Salad

 

Herbed Bulgur Salad
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Ingredients
  1. 1/2 cup dry bulgur (cracked wheat)
  2. 1 cup boiling water
  3. big handfuls of fresh parsley and cilantro, leaves pulled off the stems and coarsely chopped (a bunch or two)
  4. a smaller handful of mint and/or dill
  5. a small handful of chopped toasted walnuts
  6. juice of a big, juicy lemon
  7. a good drizzle of good olive oil
  8. if you like: tiny tomatoes, crumbled feta, shaved cucumber
Instructions
  1. Put the dry bulgur into a bowl and pour the boiling water overtop; cover with a plate and let stand for 10-15 minutes. Pour off any water than hasn't been absorbed (I like to do this in a sieve, shaking it to make sure all excess moisture is gone) and transfer to a bowl and set aside or in the fridge to cool.
  2. Add the herbs, squeeze over the lemon juice and a good glug of oil, toss and add the toasted walnuts (and anything else you think would taste good). Serves 4-6ish.
The Best of Bridge https://www.bestofbridge.com/

Many people overlook fresh herbs as a potential salad ingredient – classic Middle Eastern tabbouleh is a notable exception, loaded with flat-leaf parsley, grains and typically cucumbers and tomatoes. It’s a perfect candidate if you have all three growing in your back yard (or at their peak at the farmers’ market), but if you want to make use of a wider variety of herbs, this leafy, herb-heavy bulgur salad is packed with green goodness: parsley, cilantro, mint and dill, but you could use anything you have on hand and love. 

This salad is simple to make – bulgur is simply soaked in boiling water, so you can plug in the kettle and don’t even need to put a pot on the stove. A squeeze of lemon gives it a brightness and brings out all the green, herbal flavours, and a drizzle of olive oil adds richness, healthy fats, and smooths everything out. We added a handful of chopped toasted walnuts, but pine nuts would  be delicious too. Feel free to add tomatoes and cukes to make it more like a classic tabbouleh.

OctoberFeast in Calgary

This is the time of year that we start thinking not only about winter and fall comfort food, but also about making sure that others in our community have something warm and wholesome in their bellies. Food banks across the country are about to kick into food-dive mode and thankfully, many of us are feeling more generous with our cash donations and canned goods as we get closer to the holidays.

Right now the Calgary Food Bank is in the middle of an event called OctoberFeast. Participating restaurants in Calgary have accepted a challenge to create dishes that use two or more ingredients from the Food Bank’s list of most needed items, which includes things like pasta, soup, canned fruits and veggies, canned fish and meat, peanut butter, rice and cereal. Some of our favourite local restaurants like Alloy, Avec Bistro, Naina’s Kitchen, Tavernetta, Without Papers and The Beltliner Diner are all participating and they’re really putting out some great dishes. The dishes will all be available until October 15 (that’s the end of this week!) Read More