Liege-style Waffles

On a trip to Waterton last weekend to help kick off the third annual food festival (it’s on now, until June 4!), I was thrilled to finally visit Waffleton, the new(ish) waffle shop founded by the creators of Wieners of Waterton. Not only do they have divine buttermilk waffles made with batter they raise overnight, they also make real Liege-style waffles, which are dense and chewy, made with rich, buttery brioche dough and pearl sugar. I’ve always wanted to give them a go, and so I finally managed to – they’re easier to make than you might think, and definitely worth the effort. If you can’t make it to Waterton (a wonderful summertime destination), make some at home like they do at Waffleton – topped with sliced strawberries and whipped cream.

Liege Waffles
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Ingredients
  1. 3/4 cup milk, warmed
  2. 1 pkg active dry yeast (about 2 tsp)
  3. 2 Tbsp sugar
  4. 3 large eggs
  5. 1 cup butter, melted
  6. 1 tsp vanilla
  7. 3 cups all-purpose flour
  8. 1/2 tsp salt
  9. 1 cup pearl sugar
Instructions
  1. Put the milk into a large bowl and sprinkle with sugar and yeast. Let stand for a few minutes, until the yeast gets foamy.
  2. Whisk in the eggs, butter and vanilla; stir in the flour and salt and stir or knead with the dough hook attachment of your stand mixer until you have a soft, sticky batter. Cover and let rise for an hour, until doubled.
  3. Stir in the pearl sugar. Preheat your waffle iron and cook about 1/4 cup at a time for 2-3 minutes, or until golden and crisp. Makes about 1 dozen Liege-style waffles.
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