Home made Christmas Marmalade is the perfect hostess gift

Christmas Marmalade

Christmas Marmalade
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Ingredients
  1. 3 medium oranges
  2. 2 lemons
  3. 11⁄2 cups cold water 375 mL
  4. 1 bottle (6 oz/170 mL) preserved ginger
  5. 6 cups granulated sugar 1.5 L
  6. 1 bottle (6 oz/170 mL) maraschino cherries, drained and chopped (add extra green cherries as well — colorful!
  7. 1 pouch liquid pectin
Instructions
  1. Wash oranges and lemons. Slice paper thin. Discard seeds. Put into large kettle. Add water and bring to a boil. Turn down heat, cover and simmer about 30 minutes, until rinds are tender and transparent. Stir occasionally.
  2. Drain ginger, saving syrup. Chop ginger finely. Add sugar, chopped ginger, ginger syrup and cherries to orange-lemon mixture. Turn heat to high and bring to a full, rolling boil, stirring constantly. Boil hard 1 minute. Remove from heat and stir in pectin. Continue stirring and skimming for 5 minutes.
  3. Ladle into hot, sterilized jars, leaving 1⁄4 inch (0.5 cm) headspace. Wipe rims and seal with two-piece canning lids. Process in a boiling water canner for 5 minutes. Check seals and refrigerate any jars that are not sealed.
  4. Makes about ten 8-oz (250 mL) jars.
The Best of Bridge http://www.bestofbridge.com/
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