Winter Slaw

Need a new idea for a crunchy Thanksgiving salad using wintry vegetables? Sure, you could go the kale route, but why not try chopped napa cabbage and thinly sliced or shaved jicama or kohlrabi? Both are fresh and crunchy; kohlrabi is a brassica vegetable and once peeled, tastes like the inside of a broccoli stalk. Jicama is a root vegetable that doesn’t look like much, but is so snappy and fresh tasting you’ll find all kinds of uses for it, from veggie platters to salads.

Measurements here are up to you – use as much of each ingredient as you like, depending on your taste and how many you have to serve. If you like, top with chopped fresh Italian flat-leaf parsley, too.

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Classic Bolognese

Although it still feels like summer, and we still eat outside when it’s sunny enough, fall is definitely here – back to school time makes me crave those classic dishes from my childhood: shepherds’ pie, chili, classy chicken, and spaghetti loaded with sauce. When we start getting back into the groove of fall schedules, I like to make a habit of preparing twice (or more) as much dinner as we need, and freezing the surplus for an almost instant dinner on another night. A classic bolognese is the perfect candidate for the freezer – and makes use of fall veggies in season, like garlic, zucchini, tomatoes and peppers, if you’re inclined to add any. Or roughly chop a bunch of veggies and skip the meat altogether for a vegetarian bolognese.

This recipe is fairly small, but can be doubled or even tripled for a larger batch – or bulk it up with extra veggies and tomatoes. Often when I have overripe tomatoes I’ll toss them in the freezer whole, then add them to sauces later.

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Inside-Out Chocolate Chip Cookies

Back to school time is cookie season for us – I don’t know whether I make them out of self-preservation or to fill lunchboxes. Everyone needs a little comforting treat when summer comes to an end, and I like baking a batch of cookies on the weekend to wrap and tuck into lunch boxes all week. Sometimes, when I’m really on the ball, I’ll make and freeze balls of dough so I have something to slide into the oven after school – there’s nothing like walking in the door after a long day and the house smells like chocolate. Bonus: with a stash of dough, you can bake a few at a time in the toaster oven, and not have a couple dozen to eat your way through.

To freeze and bake, freeze balls on a sheet and then transfer to a freezer bag; take them out, place them on a parchment-lined sheet and let them sit while the oven preheats, then bake as directed.

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No-knead Pizza Dough

It’s back-to-school time, when schedules tighten up and there’s suddenly less time to get dinner on the table, but I have good news for you: the no-knead bread that took over the internet a few years ago also makes amazing pizza dough. You can mix it up the night before, and make pizza in minutes when everyone gets home and is ready to eat.

It makes for a wonderfully chewy, bulbous pizza crust – the dough itself is fairly sticky, so use flour to keep it from sticking to your fingers, and parchment or a silpat mat on your baking sheet, unless you have a pizza stone to cook it on.

No-knead Pizza Dough
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Ingredients
  1. 3 cups all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting (or use whole wheat, or half and half)
  2. 1/4 tsp. active dry yeast (instant or regular)
  3. 1 tsp. salt
Instructions
  1. In a large bowl stir together the flour, yeast and salt. Add 1 1/2 cups of water, and stir until blended; the dough will be shaggy and sticky. Cover the bowl with a plate or plastic wrap and let it rest on the countertop for 18-24 hours at room temperature.
  2. After that time the surface of the dough will be dotted with bubbles. Generously flour a work surface and scrape the mixture out onto it, gently folding it over itself once or twice, then transfer to a rimmed baking sheet that has been sprinkled with flour or cornmeal. Spread it out with your fingertips until it's a rough oval or rectangle (you may need to sprinkle the top with a little flour too, to keep it from sticking to your fingers), and set it aside while you get your toppings together and preheat the oven to 450°F.
  3. Spread the crust with tomato sauce, barbecue sauce, pesto or anything else you'd like to sauce it with, then top with your choice of toppings and grated cheese.
  4. Bake for 20-30 minutes, until bubbly and golden.
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Grilled French Toast

Most often, backyard barbecues are fired up to cook meat – burgers and steak, generally – and almost always used at dinnertime. It’s a shame that such a useful cooking tool rarely sees its full potential – outdoor grills provide high, direct heat that’s ideal for cooking much more than burgers. The fact that cooking outdoors doesn’t heat up the house makes me want to use it all times of the day – including the morning, on weekends when we linger over breakfast.

All types of bread work here, but make sure it’s cut thick – sourdough, multigrain, challah and raisin bread are all delicious, or try cinnamon buns, cut in half crosswise. Whichever bread you choose, it should be at least a day old – fresh bread tends to make mushy French toast. To top it off, grill some peaches, mango or other juicy stone fruit – cut in half or in wedges, pit them and place cut-side down on the grill until softened and grill-marked. Slice overtop, letting the juices mingle with the maple syrup.

Grilled French Toast
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Ingredients
  1. 2 large eggs
  2. 1/2 cup milk
  3. 1 tsp. vanilla (optional)
  4. 4 thick slices day-old bread
  5. Cinnamon (optional)
Instructions
  1. In a shallow bowl, stir the eggs, milk and vanilla together with a fork. Brush the grill with oil and preheat it to medium-high.
  2. Dip each slice of bread in the egg mixture, coating both sides well and letting it soak in. Pick up the slices and let the excess egg drip off; then place them in a baking dish to take them outside. Sprinkle them with cinnamon if you like.
  3. Grill the French toast until it’s until on both sides, about 2 minutes on the first side and 1 minute on the second, flipping as necessary. Close the lid to create an oven environment, which will help them cook through. Serve them right away with syrup and fresh fruit, or keep them warm on the top rack of the grill or in a 200°F oven while you cook the rest.
  4. Serves 4.
The Best of Bridge https://www.bestofbridge.com/

Saskatoon Peroghies

If you live on the prairies, chances are you’ve had saskatoons in something – pie or jam, probably, and maybe even in sweet peroghies. Saskatoons (the city was named for them) are hardy shrub berries, less juicy but similar in look, shape, colour and flavour to a blueberry, with more pulp and slightly thicker skins. Botanically, saskatoons are in the same family as roses and apples; the wee purple ones come into season sometime around August, and if you don’t have a secret picking spot, keep an eye out for them next time you’re out on a hike or at the dog park. Some local grocery stores sell them frozen, too.

There is perhaps no dish more prairie-influenced than peroghies stuffed with saskatoons. Eat them for dessert, boiled and then cooked until golden and crisp in a hot pan with butter, topped with sour cream, crème fraîche or vanilla yogurt. They’re also delicious for breakfast or brunch.

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