Saskatoon Peroghies

If you live on the prairies, chances are you’ve had saskatoons in something – pie or jam, probably, and maybe even in sweet peroghies. Saskatoons (the city was named for them) are hardy shrub berries, less juicy but similar in look, shape, colour and flavour to a blueberry, with more pulp and slightly thicker skins. Botanically, saskatoons are in the same family as roses and apples; the wee purple ones come into season sometime around August, and if you don’t have a secret picking spot, keep an eye out for them next time you’re out on a hike or at the dog park. Some local grocery stores sell them frozen, too.

There is perhaps no dish more prairie-influenced than peroghies stuffed with saskatoons. Eat them for dessert, boiled and then cooked until golden and crisp in a hot pan with butter, topped with sour cream, crème fraîche or vanilla yogurt. They’re also delicious for breakfast or brunch.

Saskatoon Peroghies
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Dough
  1. 3 cups all-purpose flour
  2. 1/2 tsp. baking powder
  3. 1/4 tsp. salt
  4. 3/4 cup milk
  5. 2 Tbsp. butter, melted, or oil
  6. 1 large egg
  7. 1/3 cup water
Filling
  1. 2/3 cup sugar
  2. 1 Tbsp. all-purpose flour
  3. 2 cups fresh or frozen saskatoon berries
  4. butter, for cooking
  5. sour cream or crème fraîche, for serving
Instructions
  1. In a large bowl, stir together the flour, baking powder and salt. In a small bowl stir together the milk, butter and egg; add the water about a third at a time, until you have soft, slightly sticky dough. Knead it about 10 times, then cover with a towel and let rest on the countertop for 20 minutes.
  2. To make the filling, stir together the sugar and flour; shake over the saskatoons and toss to coat. On lightly floured surface, roll out the dough to a scant 1/4-inch thickness. Using a 3-inch round cutter, cut into rounds. Stretch each round slightly; fill with a spoonful of the saskatoon mixture, ensuring you get some of the sugar-flour in there as well. Pull the dough over filling into semicircle; pinch edges together to seal. Cover with tea towel. Repeat with remaining dough and filling. Freeze in a single layer or cook immediately.
  3. To cook, bring a large pot of lightly salted water to a boil and cook the peroghies (fresh or from frozen) in batches, until they float to the top and the dough is tender, about 10 minutes. Meanwhile, set a heavy skillet over medium-high heat and add a generous dab of butter. With a slotted spoon, transfer the boiled peroghies to the hot pan and cook until golden and crisp on each side. Serve with sour cream or crème fraiche.
  4. Makes about 3 dozen peroghies.
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