Cottage Cheese Pancakes

We love cottage cheese pancakes around here – dense and slightly cheesy, they’re higher in protein than traditional pancakes, and delicious with tart berries or compote drizzled over top. They’re wonderful on leisurely holiday weekends, especially with berries to brighten them up – or thin leftover cranberry sauce with maple syrup to drizzle over top. Leftovers can be frozen and popped into the toaster or microwave for a warm, hearty winter breakfast that will set you up for a day at work or on the slopes.

Cottage Cheese Pancakes
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Ingredients
  1. 1 cup cottage cheese
  2. 3 large eggs
  3. 1/4 cup sugar
  4. pinch salt
  5. 1/4 cup milk
  6. 1 cup all-purpose flour
  7. 1 tsp. baking powder
  8. 2 Tbsp. vegetable oil or melted butter
Instructions
  1. In a large bowl, beat together the cottage cheese, eggs, sugar and salt; mix until smooth, then add the milk and stir until creamy. Add the flour and baking powder and stir just until blended; stir in the oil or melted butter.
  2. Preheat a griddle or skillet over medium heat and brush with butter or oil or spray with nonstick spray. Drop batter (I used a small ladle) onto the pan and cook until bubbles begin to break the surface and the edges no longer appear wet - flip using a thin spatula and cook until golden on the other side as well. Serve immediately or keep warm in a 250F oven until they are all cooked.
  3. Serves 2-4; recipe can be easily doubled.
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